Profit & Nothing But! Or Impolite Thoughts On The Class Struggle

Raoul Peck’s 52-minute film about the effects of market economy and globalization on his homeland, Haiti, is more a film essay than a traditional documentary. Instead of facts and figures, Peck offers the learned commentary of various economists, including Rene Passet, Serge Latouche and Haiti’s agricultural minister, Gérald Mathurin, as well as his own personal reflections on the way in which so-called free market capitalism has rendered Haiti a country that “theoretically doesn’t exist.” Capitalism, they feel, is a system that serves only the richest citizens of the richest nations, and they note a deep contradiction between its self-proclaimed triumph and the reality of day-to-day life in countries like Haiti — countries whose markets have been drastically deregulated to encourage exports of their most valuable resources, while importing the worst of what the rest of the world has to offer. The system has succeeded in turning money into capital: Rather than a means of expediting the exchange of goods in an attempt to meet the basic needs of the people, money has become the goal of transactions. It accumulates in the bottomless coffers of a handful of paranoid super-capitalists interested only in increasing their fortunes, regardless of the effects. Men like Bill Gates, whose personal worth equals Haiti’s cumulative GNP for the next 30 years. This “crazy machine” — an opaque, feudal system whose true nature remains invisible — is now out of control, Latouche argues, but our society facilitates blindness to its dysfunctions by encouraging irresponsibility and a forgetfulness that Peck likens to a form of societal Alzheimer’s disease. And in the face of this illusory triumph, which smothers dissent and renders discussion pointless, Peck ultimately questions the futility of creating images. Are they to exist only as mementos to lost battles? Impassioned and deeply troubling, Peck’s film is not entirely without hope, and would make a powerful double bill with LIFE AND DEBT, Stephanie Black’s 2001 film about globalization’s disastrous impact on Jamaica’s economy.

Raoul Peck’s 52-minute film about the effects of market economy and globalization on his homeland, Haiti, is more a film essay than a traditional documentary. Instead of facts and figures, Peck offers the learned commentary of various economists, including Rene Passet, Serge Latouche and Haiti’s agricultural minister, Gérald Mathurin, as well as his own personal reflections on the way in which so-called free market capitalism has rendered Haiti a country that “theoretically doesn’t exist.” Capitalism, they feel, is a system that serves only the richest citizens of the richest nations, and they note a deep contradiction between its self-proclaimed triumph and the reality of day-to-day life in countries like Haiti — countries whose markets have been drastically deregulated to encourage exports of their most valuable resources, while importing the worst of what the rest of the world has to offer. The system has succeeded in turning money into capital: Rather than a means of expediting the exchange of goods in an attempt to meet the basic needs of the people, money has become the goal of transactions. It accumulates in the bottomless coffers of a handful of paranoid super-capitalists interested only in increasing their fortunes, regardless of the effects. Men like Bill Gates, whose personal worth equals Haiti’s cumulative GNP for the next 30 years. This “crazy machine” — an opaque, feudal system whose true nature remains invisible — is now out of control, Latouche argues, but our society facilitates blindness to its dysfunctions by encouraging irresponsibility and a forgetfulness that Peck likens to a form of societal Alzheimer’s disease. And in the face of this illusory triumph, which smothers dissent and renders discussion pointless, Peck ultimately questions the futility of creating images. Are they to exist only as mementos to lost battles? Impassioned and deeply troubling, Peck’s film is not entirely without hope, and would make a powerful double bill with LIFE AND DEBT, Stephanie Black’s 2001 film about globalization’s disastrous impact on Jamaica’s economy.

From: http://movies.tvguide.com/profit-and-nothing-but-or-impolite-thoughts-on-the-class-struggle/review/135951

Food, Inc.

Food, Inc. is a 2008 American documentary film directed by Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Robert Kenner. The film examines corporate farming in the United States, concluding that agribusiness produces food that is unhealthy, in a way that is environmentally harmful and abusive of both animals and employees. The film is narrated by Michael Pollan and Eric Schlosser.

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food,_Inc.

Capitalism Is The Crisis

The 2008 “financial crisis” in the United States was a systemic fraud in which the wealthy finance capitalists stole trillions of public dollars. No one was jailed for this crime, the largest theft of public money in history.

Instead, the rich forced working people across the globe to pay for their “crisis” through punitive “austerity” programs that gutted public services and repealed workers’ rights.

Austerity was named “Word of the Year” for 2010.

This documentary explains the nature of capitalist crisis, visits the protests against austerity measures, and recommends revolutionary paths for the future.

Special attention is devoted to the crisis in Greece, the 2010 G20 Summit protest in Toronto, Canada, and the remarkable surge of solidarity in Madison, Wisconsin.

It may be their crisis, but it’s our problem.

From: http://www.capitalismisthecrisis.net

Overdose: The Next Financial Crisis

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When the world’s financial bubble blew, the solution was to lower interest rates and pump trillions of dollars into the sick banking system. The solution is the problem, that’s why we had a problem in the first place. For Economics Nobel laureate Vernon Smith, the Catch 22 is self-evident. But interest rates have been at rock bottom for years, and governments are running out of fuel to feed the economy. The governments can save the banks, but who can save the governments? Forecasts predict all countries’ debt will reach 100% of GDP by next year. Greece and Iceland have already crumbled, who will be next?

From: http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/overdose-next-financial-crisis/

The Zionist History

The Zionist Story, an independent film by Ronen Berelovich, is the story of ethnic cleansing, colonialism and apartheid to produce a demographically Jewish State.

Ronen successfully combines archival footage with commentary from himself and others such as Ilan Pappe, Terry Boullata, Alan Hart and Jeff Halper.

From the author: I have recently finished an independent documentary, The Zionist Story, in which I aim to present not just the history of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, but also the core reason for it: the Zionist ideology, its goals (past and present) and its firm grip not only on Israeli society, but also, increasingly, on the perception of Middle East issues in Western democracies.

These concepts have already been demonstrated in the excellent Occupation 101 documentary made by Abdallah Omeish and Sufyan Omeish, but in my documentary I approach the subject from the perspective of an Israeli, ex-reserve soldier and someone who has spent his entire life in the shadow of Zionism.

From: http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/zionist-story/